About Us

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Our Approach

In Peru, we meet people anxious and prepared to learn from our team of professionals, for they know that the things we share can make a difference. We feel great satisfaction in providing for others the knowledge, skills, and training necessary for them to make a difference in their communities, to teach others, and to save lives.

 

Our events are designed so that participants will experience interactive activities in schools or in remote rural villages. Optional tours to the Sacred Valley, including Machu Picchu are available. Our cultural experiences bring you to the high Andes Mountains outside Cusco into very small villages.

 

Our Story

In Peru, we meet people anxious and prepared to learn from our team of professionals, for they know that the things we share can make a difference.  We feel great satisfaction in providing for others the knowledge, skills, and training necessary for them to make a difference in their communities, to teach others, and to save lives.  We desire to continue our efforts to empower doctors, nurses, and midwives to respond quickly and effectively to complications related to the birth process and to help save the lives of newborns and their mothers.  Our goal is to certify doctors, midwives and nurses to become core professionals who are able to teach others the principles and practices of neonatal resuscitation. 

Let me introduce ourselves, we are a group of three 501[c]3 foundations:  The Terri Lee Cornell Dowdle Foundation, Reach Out and Learn Inc., and The Janice Foundation.  Volunteers from these three organizations have worked together over the past several years to empower doctors, nurses and midwives to respond quickly and effectively to complications related to the birth process and to help save the lives of newborns and their mothers.  Our experience has taught us how to make a lasting and significant difference in these people’s lives.  Our approach is based on trust and relationships.  This is earned by getting involved in the practice of medicine on their terms and meeting their needs, not ours.  This trust does not come from short-term projects accomplished by medical tourism.  It results from consistent, sincere expressions of love and concern.  Developing this trust with our Peruvian friends has opened the doors for us to teach and train their professionals, empowering them to change and improve their lives into the future.

TLCD foundation was created in honor of the late Terri Lee Cornell Dowdle.  She left a legacy of kindness and service to others.  The TLCD foundation has many endeavors. The purpose of what we are doing is focusing on the women and children of the world.  It is our goal to make a sustainable impact in the Cusco area of Peru.  We have done this by becoming friends and partners with the people we love and serve and hope to continue this legacy.

Reach Out And Learn was started by a group of people whose focus is on learning together with and training professionals in foreign countries who help and care for those in need and to improve the lifestyle of individuals, families, and communities.  These professionals fulfill a critical role to presentations, workshops, and observe, consult, and advise foreign professionals in their native workplaces.  They provide service that has a major impact to help those in need by  training those who help those in need.

The Janice Foundation strives to reduce suffering of women throughout the world.  Work has been focused in Africa and South America.  The Janice Foundation supports the efforts in training midwives, first responders and other healthcare professionals in the Peruvian Andes to reduce the risks of maternal death and hemorrhage and on newborn resuscitation.

Throughout the years that we have been presenting medical education conferences in Peru, we have found that there is a huge need for professional training in Peru.  Education conferences and training are scarce and we have found that those who treat and care for those with physical issues and problems have a great interest in and a desire for more training and education.  In both 2013 and 2014, we had more than 150 Peruvian neonatal professionals attend our conferences in Cusco, Sicuani, and Quillabamba.

In the past, most of the groups have struggled working together.  Since working with the people of Peru, we have integrated very well as they prepare to learn together.  We have developed the infrastructure that has put us in a position, where medical professionals in Peru have asked us for the information and from them to direct what they needed.  There is no way we could have come from the outside and immediately known their true needs.  It required them to confide in us their problems and for us to work together to seek solutions and lasting change.  We have found that our effectiveness has come from teaming and working with the midlevel providers.  They are the ones who know the needs, do the work, need the support, get little of the credit, and generally are the backbone of what needs done.  They are in charge; we are there to supplement them.  We no longer are running clinics.  They then share this information with those who were not present at the training.  Peruvians are far better and more effective teachers than we could ever be in this  setting.

We share information regarding neonatal resuscitation, hypertension and pregnancy, postpartum, difficult deliveries including vacuum extraction.  We take our knowledge into areas that are not readily serviced by the Peruvian government.  A team of professionals does this mainly from Idaho and Utah.  We work with and through the Peruvians and try and help them to do most of the teaching.  We have seen that the vacuum-assisted delivery device has been able to reduce the number of C-sections performed in this area of Peru.  Additionally, when Peruvian medical professionals have used donated medical equipment and techniques that we have shared, they have been able to minimize the resolve postpartum hemorrhage after giving birth. 

Doctors, nurses, and midwives, have expressed an especially great desire for neonatal resuscitation training.  We fill this need and desire by using a method that we have had past  success with. 

Recently we have started utilizing the skills of the LDS missionaries to help us in translation and teaching. This has improved our communication and our interaction with the people.  There are many Peruvians who feel like our ability and desire to teach comes from our experience, knowledge and affluence.  They do not understand that our desire to teach comes from our love of other people and our desire to share the goodness.  When they work with the missionaries they know that they have limited clinical background, yet they feel a certain Spirit about them that they can’t define.  This greatly elevates what we teach and how we teach.

Meet the Team

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Chad Fugate

 

Chad Fugate is a founding member of the Reach Out & Learn board of directors. His qualifications include serving as a board member of several humanitarian organizations including Chasqui Foundation, Ascend Alliance, and Idaho Condor. He has led more than 70 teams in Peru and Bolivia since 1999. His educational background includes graduation from Westminster College with a BA in liberal arts and a BS in Nursing. He completed Anesthesia Training in Wisconsin and has worked as a CRNA (Nurse Anesthetist) since 1981. He studies Organizational Leadership with Gonzaga University Masters program and has earned a certificate in Servant Leadership. He also enjoys teaching at Idaho State University as affiliate faculty in the PA program. His honors include Humanitarian of the year awarded by the Idaho State Association of Nurse Anesthetists. Chad runs his own anesthesia service business working in 8 hospitals and surgery centers. He is passionate about doing humanitarian work that provides sustainable results long after our carefully directed efforts. Chad speaks Spanish and is key to our work to “learn together” with and build strong relationships of trust with those we work with.

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Mark A. Dowdle, MD

Mark A. Dowdle, MD is from Boise, Idaho.  Mark is a board certified Obstetrician and Gynecologist and has helped with international projects for many years.  He served on the board of the College of Obstetrics and Gynecology.  He was educated at Brigham Young University where he received BS and then a MS in community health. He received his MD at University of Utah and his specialty at William Beaumont Hospital in Royal Oak, Michigan. He  enjoys teaching at Idaho State University as affiliate faculty in the PA program.  He has served an LDS mission to Peru in 1972-1974.  He married Terri Cornell who passed away from cancer in 2006.  They have two children and five grandchildren.  In 2007 he then married Nicki Darrington.  Together, Mark and Nicki have worked to make a difference in Peru and it has been a positive process of growth and relationships.  They feel that relationships are the key to the success in Peru and to long lasting results.

 

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Sean Esplin, MD

Sean Esplin, MD from Provo, Utah received his undergraduate degree from Brigham Young University.  Dr. Esplin has worked at the University of Utah Maternal-Fetal Medicine Division since 2000, after completion of his Maternal-Fetal Medicine Fellowship at the University of Utah. He is board certified in both Obstetrics and Gynecology and the subspecialty of Maternal-Fetal Medicine. Dr. Esplin's main areas of interest are the genetic control of term and preterm labor and the role of inflammation in preterm birth. Dr. Esplin is currently involved in several ongoing research projects sponsored by the National Institutes of Health aimed at identifying markers of preterm birth and obstetric complications. Dr. Esplin speaks Spanish, which adds to his ability to connect to those who attend his workshop training sessions.

 

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